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European Short News
Finnish RE- Program
A new Finnish Action Program for renewable energy was outlined in a publication by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry in November, 1999. It is based on a Finnish white paper for renewable-energy promotion, which was adopted by the government in 1999. It will increase the Finnish national share of renewable energy from 21% to an estimated 27% of primary energy consumption. It is a strengthening of previous renewable- energy promotion programs.

Information: Ari Lampinen, ala@jyu.fi, Finnish Society for Nature Conservation and Technology for Life which is an INFORSE member organisation.
World’s Largest Wind Cooperative in Denmark
In December, the largest wind cooperative so far received final permission to go ahead with the construction of 10 2-MW wind turbines in the sea just outside the Copenhagen Harbour.
The project, “Middelgrunden”, which also includes 10 wind turbines owned by the Copenhagen utilities, will be the world’s largest off-shore wind park so far. The investment for the 10 turbines, appr. 160 mill. DKK ($US 22 mill.), is coming from appr. 7,000 shareholders. The production, 40 GWh/year, will cover 3% of the electricity demand of Copenhagen. The turbines will be installed during the year 2000.

Photo: “Middelgrunden” wind park near Copenhagen. Computer generated image.

Information: www.middelgrunden.dk.
A Less Nuclear Sweden
Finally, on November 30, 1999, the first reactor of the Swedish Nuclear Power Plant at Barsebäck closed for good.
It is the first of the larger Swedish reactors to close. The other reactor at Barsebäck is scheduled to close in 2001.
The closure of this nuclear power plant in Sweden is a victory for the long-standing anti-nuclear campaigns in Sweden and in Denmark. The capital city of Denmark, Copenhagen, is only 22 km away from Barsebäck.
A Less Nuclear Sweden
Finally, on November 30, 1999, the first reactor of the Swedish Nuclear Power Plant at Barsebäck closed for good.
It is the first of the larger Swedish reactors to close. The other reactor at Barsebäck is scheduled to close in 2001.
The closure of this nuclear power plant in Sweden is a victory for the long-standing anti-nuclear campaigns in Sweden and in Denmark. The capital city of Denmark, Copenhagen, is only 22 km away from Barsebäck.
Will Turkey Be Nuclear?
In spite of widespread protests, Turkey is going ahead with plans for construction of its first nuclear power plant. The proposed site is in Akkuyu on the Mediterranean coast, just north of Cyprus. One focus of recent protests has been the earthquake risk for a nuclear power plant, because there is an active geological fault line near the site.
The Turkish government expects to choose a construction contractor in the beginning of 2000. Three consortia are competing for the project: Atomic Energy of Canada in cooperation with Hitachi, Ansaldo (Italy), Daewoo (South Korea), and others; a consortium of Siemens and Framatome; and a consortium of Westinghouse and Mitsubishi.

Information: Nuclear Awareness Project, e-mail: nucaware@web.net, www.diaspora-net.org/nuclear/
No Decision for K2R4
Although we told you in our last issue that we expected a decision soon from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) about loans for the controversial Khmelnitsky 2 and Rivne 4 reactors in Ukraine, this has not happened.
It is currently unclear when the decision will be taken. During the waiting, we hope that more countries will voice opposition to the project, as the majority of the Dutch Parliament did in December, following the examples of Austria and Germany.

Information: BankWatch Network CEE, K2R4 Campaign: www.ecn.cz/k2r4/.
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ISSUE #28 (981KB) 20 pages (2000-02-28)
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